Thursday, 24 April 2014

1960s Italian-made Meazzi Hollywood Supersonic with built-in amp

guitarz.blogspot.com:
I don't have much to say about this 1960s Italian Meazzi Hollywood Supersonic other than it is refreshing to see a guitar with built-in amp and speaker that doesn't look like a cheap and nasty effort thrown together to amuse the kids. This guitar looks to be nicely built and has that coolness factor. As to how well it performs in reality, I am unfortunately unable to comment.

Currently listed on eBay with a Buy It Now price of €749.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
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Tuesday, 22 April 2014

1960s Ibanez "handcrafted by Goldentone" Model 5902 Bison Bass

guitarz.blogspot.com:

It seems funny to think that Ibanez - now a high prestige guitar manufacturer - were once just yet another Japanese brand churning out "copy" guitars. Here we see Ibanez copy a British manufacturer with this 1960s-era Ibanez Model 5902 Bass which appears to be an amalgam of several Burns designs, although it is particularly Bison-like in the horns. Quite who "Goldentone" were supposed to be, I couldn't say. It's probably just another random brand name that the Japanese factory thought would look impressive. Note the headstock with its 3+1 tuner layout - yet ANOTHER design pre-dating Music Man but that doesn't stop Ernie Ball thinking it's their intellectual property.

Currently listed on eBay UK with a starting bid of £400 and a Buy It Now price of £599.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

Monday, 21 April 2014

1968 Eko Kadett Bass

guitarz.blogspot.com:
We've looked at a few of these Eko Kadetts on Guitarz before, but I have a soft spot for 1960s Italian-made guitars and basses and always enjoy a bass design that owes very little to Fender's Precision or Jazz Bass. Their short scale and very thin, almost parallel along the length, necks don't make basses like this play anything like a contemporary instrument. Personally I wouldn't think a bass like this would be perform particularly well for live work, unless you're trying to play a crazy fuzz bass lead part or something. I'm not denying its coolness factor; as a former vintage Eko bass owner I will readily admit that for recording there are some very interesting tones to be had, but generally speaking I'd say this was one for the collectors.

Currently listed on eBay with a Buy It Now price of US $495.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

Saturday, 19 April 2014

More 1960s innovation: the WEM Fifth Man Project IV guitar

guitarz.blogspot.com:
Here's another all-but-forgotten guitar innovation from the 1960s. From Watkins Electric Music in London, it's the WEM Fifth Man Project IV guitar which could perhaps be thought of as a pre-cursor to the Fernandes Sustainer. Magnets either side of the top (i.e. body end) of the neck are used to create a magnetic field across the strings resulting in a sustaining drone effect. Check out the below video to get a better understanding of what it does.


The guitar pictured at the top of this blog post is currently listed on eBay UK with a Buy It Now price of £749, but please note that it is in need of restoration, of example one of the neck magnets is missing.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

Friday, 18 April 2014

1978 Bunker Pro Star electric guitar from a true design innovator

guitarz.blogspot.com:
We've looked at Bunker guitars and basses several times before on Guitarz but I couldn't resist showing you this Bunker Pro Star guitar from 1978 as currently listed on eBay with a Buy It Now price of US $1,999.

Dave Bunker was a guitar builder way ahead of his time. His designs date back to the 1960s and pre-dated the headless craze of the 1980s; this particular example is effectively headless - note how the headstock is not structurally part of the neck.  More interestingly, the guitar features Bunker's "tension-free neck" in which:
"... a heavy brass nut [was] fixed to a thick brass bar that was attached to another block of metal in the body. A wooden neck was routed out and slipped over this brass core. Strings were anchored into the nut and stretched down to tuners on the butt end of the guitar. The brass neck core took all the tension of the strings, keeping the wooden neck free of any tension whatsoever."
How well in practice this actually worked, I couldn't possibly comment having never seen one of these "in the flesh" as it were, but I am reminded of the skeletal metal Born To Rock guitars and basses which also featured a floating neck which uses the strings themselves to actually position itself correctly.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

Wednesday, 16 April 2014

Unknown 1960s four-pickup leftie guitar - Can anyone help identify?

guitarz.blogspot.com:
This 1960s four-pickup leftie solidbody guitar looks in need of a little TLC and a renovation! But what is it? Does anyone out there recognise it? My thinking is that it is probably Japanese, but I'm going mainly by the headstock shape which does seem strangely familiar. The finish on the front of the guitar and the face of the headstock has been stripped. I'm wondering if it may have had some kind of plastic/celluloid coating - could those strange marks on the stripped surface be where it was glued?

Currently being auctioned on eBay with bidding at US $109.26 at the time of writing.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

Tuesday, 15 April 2014

Dean Z-X Fake leopard fur fabric-covered Explorer

guitarz.blogspot.com:
Some crazy crazy dude - very possibly inspired by ZZ Top - has covered this Dean Z-X Explorer type guitar in fake leopard fur fabric. Need I comment any more? Other than to say that I hope whoever plays this guitar doesn't get too hot and sweaty on stage as it could end up being really stinky, and it's not like you can just bung it in the washing machine.

Currently listed on eBay with a Buy It Now price of US $475.

Thanks to Tony E for bringing this guitar to my attention.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

Sunday, 13 April 2014

1961 Hagström Deluxe 90 in blue sparkle finish

guitarz.blogspot.com:
I know we've looked at these particular glitzy celluloid-covered guitars before here on Guitarz but they don't come up for sale very often on eBay, and not only does this example currently listed have some nice clean close-up photos, but it's also one of my personal favourites and so I reckon it's worth looking at again.

To borrow from the eBay listing:
This [Hagström Deluxe 90] was made in Sweden around 1961 (batch 499). This is a sparkle and pearloid model. The top is has blue sparkle finish with the rest done in a pearloid wrap. The fretboard is acrylic. 22 frets and 23 1/4 inches scale length. Four single coil pickups and six buttons. Tremar tremolo system.

The neck is straight and it is easy to play. The guitar is all original with no restoration. The original pick holder is still on the back of the headstock. It is a lot of fun to play.  I am including a vintage case for shipping.

This is the nicest example I have seen of one of these guitars. The pearloid wrap and binding tends to shrink over time and it exhibits some minor cracks. Much less than I have seen in most examples of this guitar.
It's interesting also to note that this guitar is currently located in Arizona in the USA, yet it carries the original Hagstrom name and has not been re-branded Goya as you'd expect to see on the "American" version. No doubt it has belonged to a collector at some point.

Currently listed on eBay with a starting bid of US $949 and a Buy It Now price of US $2,200.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

Saturday, 12 April 2014

Ampeg Big Stud - a 1970s Japanese take on the Precision/Telecaster Bass

guitarz.blogspot.com:
We recently looked at an early 1970s Fender Telecaster Bass which itself was a reissue, or rather, a reinterpretation of the original pre-redesign Fender Precision Bass. Here we see another 1970s interpretation of the same design by the Japanese, marketed under the Ampeg brandname. This particular model was named the Ampeg Big Stud; there was also a Little Stud model fashioned more in keeping with the traditional Precision bass.

When I first saw this bass I did wonder momentarily if it was a short or medium-scale bass, but it does indeed have the full 34" long scale length. I think it must be an optical illusion created by Ampeg's choice of a smaller 2+2 headstock.

Notable users include bassist Senon Williams of Cambodian pop/psychedelic band Dengue Fever.

Currently listed on eBay UK with a Buy It Now price of £375.00.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

Thursday, 10 April 2014

Original 1970s John Birch bass

guitarz.blogspot.com:
At one time back in the mid 1970s barely a week could go by without seeing an example or two of British guitar maker John Birch's work on BBC TV's Top Of The Pops. They were fairly ubiquitous on the UK music scene, being used to artists such as Slade, The Glitter Band, Wizzard, Mud, Black Sabbath, Brian May, Ritchie Blackmore and others. Here we see an original 70s John Birch bass, which has obviously been very closely modelled on a certain famous American bass guitar design. It deviates from that design however in use of hardware such as John Birch's own Hyperflux pickups, the maple fingerboard, and the green burst finish. It also seems to have a baffling number of control knobs - this is something that John Birch instruments are particularly known for.

The image of the rear of the bass shows a heel-less neck-through design, and also - quite bizarrely - a huge backplate that covers the entire rear of the body. I'm thinking that maybe this conceals a larger than usual control cavity - maybe there's some specialised tone circuitry in there and controlled by the two extra pots on the front of the body.

Currently listed on eBay UK with a Buy It Now price of £1,500.

G L Wilson

© 2014, Guitarz - The Original Guitar Blog - the blog that goes all the way to 11!
Please read our photo and content policy.

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